Friday, September 6, 2019

Soft Drink Consumption and Mortality in 10 European Countries

A study of 10 countries in Europe showed "greater consumption of total, sugar-sweetened, and artificially sweetened soft drinks was associated with a higher risk of all-cause mortality. Consumption of artificially sweetened soft drinks was positively associated with deaths from circulatory diseases, and sugar-sweetened soft drinks were associated with deaths from digestive diseases." 
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Soft drink shelf 2.jpg
Credit: The Photographer / Wikimedia Commons

The new study coordinated by researchers from the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) examined the association between total, sugar-sweetened, and artificially sweetened soft drink consumption and subsequent total and cause-specific mortality.

The study included data from more than 450 000 people in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) cohort, with an average follow-up period of more than 16 years. Compared with participants who drank less than one glass of sugar-sweetened or artificially sweetened soft drinks per month, participants who drank two or more glasses of these drinks per day had a higher risk of all-cause mortality.

In addition, consumption of two or more glasses of artificially sweetened soft drinks per day was found to be positively associated with deaths from circulatory diseases, and consumption of one or more glasses of sugar-sweetened soft drinks per day was found to be positively associated with deaths from digestive diseases.

Contacts and sources:
International Agency for Research on Cancer

Citation: Association Between Soft Drink Consumption and Mortality in 10 European Countries.
Amy Mullee, Dora Romaguera, Jonathan Pearson-Stuttard, Vivian Viallon, Magdalena Stepien, Heinz Freisling, Guy Fagherazzi, Francesca Romana Mancini, Marie-Christine Boutron-Ruault, Tilman Kühn, Rudolf Kaaks, Heiner Boeing, Krasimira Aleksandrova, Anne Tjønneland, Jytte Halkjær, Kim Overvad, Elisabete Weiderpass, Guri Skeie, Christine L. Parr, J. Ramón Quirós, Antonio Agudo, Maria-Jose Sánchez, Pilar Amiano, Lluís Cirera, Eva Ardanaz, Kay-Tee Khaw, Tammy Y. N. Tong, Julie A. Schmidt, Antonia Trichopoulou, Georgia Martimianaki, Anna Karakatsani, Domenico Palli, Claudia Agnoli, Rosario Tumino, Carlotta Sacerdote, Salvatore Panico, Bas Bueno-de-Mesquita, W. M. Monique Verschuren, Jolanda M. A. Boer, Roel Vermeulen, Stina Ramne, Emily Sonestedt, Bethany van Guelpen, Pernilla Lif Holgersson, Konstantinos K. Tsilidis, Alicia K. Heath, David Muller, Elio Riboli, Marc J. Gunter, Neil Murphy. JAMA Internal Medicine, 2019; DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2019.2478



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